SV Temple Sravana Poornima Celebrations

Posted August 19, 2013 by admin in Cultural Events

Shravan Poornima or Narali Purnima 2013 date is 21 August 2013. Narali Purnima is celebrated on the full Moon day of the month Shravan. Prayers are offered to Varuna Deva. Narali Purnima in 2013, like every year, will be celebrated with great joy. Narali Purnima or Narial Purnima is celebrated by the fishing community. Narial which means coconuts, are offered to the sea god Varuna, to seek his blessings for a fruitful fishing season, hence the name Narali Purnima.

Shravana Purnima, the day to celebrate Raksha Bandhan begins with performing of puja after going through morning chores and taking bath by all the family members. The rituals performed on this day are very auspicious. “Shudikaran” ritual is performed on this day. In some parts of the India the ritual of replacing “Yagnopavit” or sacred threads with new ones is carried out.
Every person who wears sacred thread and has an inclination towards religion takes an oath of piousness and changes his sacred thread. Donation is given to Brahmins according to one’s capability and they are provided food. Lord Vishnu and goddess Lakshmi are worshipped on this day. The Worship of Vishnu and Lakshmi gives happiness, wealth and prosperity. Lord Shiva, Vishnu, Mahalaksmi and Hanuman are offered sacred thread on this day.

The month of Shravan is considered very sacred and auspicious for the very reason that, it is filled with festivals. Shravan month is mainly dedicated to the worship of Lord Shiva. Shravan Somvar Vrats are one of the most important ritual observed by many during this month. Women observe fast and offer prayers to Goddess Parvati on Mangal Gowri Vrats which is observed on Tuesdays.

Yajurveda Upkarma:
Upakarma (pronounced upaakarma) called Veda Upaakarma is one of the ancient Vedic rituals practiced to date.
The event is conducted once a year, in the month of Shraavana (mid August – mid September) and all the Brahmins follow it. The main activity performed in an Upakarma is the changing of the Yajnopavita (Yagnopavita) or the Holy Thread, Tarpanam to Rishis and Vedarambha. The day and its subsequent day are of great significance to Brahmins.
Upakarma, in Sanskrit, means “going near to and implicitly means to the teacher” and historically, the day was considered auspicious for beginning the Vedic studies.
Upakarma is a highly auspicious ceremony for the Vedic Brahmin community. The Upakarma dates in 2013 (for Eastern Australia) are August the 21st and 22nd for Gayatri japam.
It is the day the sacred thread worn by Brahmins known as ‘Yagnopavitam’ is changed. There are Brahmins who are the followers of Rig Veda, Yajur Veda and Sama Veda and they have separate dates for Upakarma. The ritual is also known as Avani Avittam in Tamil Nadu and Kerala.
Yajur Vedi Upakarma is observed on the Shravan Poornima day (Full moon day in Sawan month). Brahmins who are the followers of Yajur Veda change the sacred thread on the day. In 2013, the date is August the 21st.
Legend has it that Lord Hayagriva, an incarnation of Lord Vishnu, got back the Vedas stolen by the Asuras (Demons) on the Shravan Purnima day.
Upakarma means ‘the beginning.’ After a holy dip in a sacred river or pond or Tritha, male Brahmins change the sacred thread and wear a new one. Symbolically the ritual means a new beginning. Students also begin the study of the Vedas on this day.
Shravan Purnima is also observed as Hayagriva Jayanthi. To honor Lord Hayagriva, the protector of Chatur Vedas, Brahmins observe Upaakarma on Shravani Purnima day.

Inner meaning of Upakarma:
This day is also auspicious as the Brahmins offer libations of water to their ancestors to whom they owe their birth and to the great Rishis to whom they are highly indebted for spiritual knowledge and the Vedas themselves.

Satyanarayana Swamy Vratham:

The Satyanarayana Vrata is a Hindu religious observance. It is a ritual performed by devotees on any major occasion like marriage, house warming ceremony etc. It can also be performed on any day for any reason. It finds first mention in Skanda Purana
The Satyanarayana Puja is usually done on the Full Moon (Purnima) day of every month or any day you wish to do it. It is also done on special occasions and during times of achievements as an offering of gratitude to the Lord Vishnu. In addition, it is said that a devotional performance of this puja will bear children to couples trying to start a family.
The Satyanarayana Puja is a Hindu religious observance. It is a ritual performed by Hindus before/on any major occasion like marriage, house warming ceremony etc. It can also be performed on any day for any reason. The Satyanarayana Puja is unique in that it does not require a Brahmin to perform.
The Satyanarayana Puja is usually done on the Pournami day of every month (full moon day), ekadasi (11th day after full moon or new moon), kartheeka paurnami, vaisakha paurnami, solar eclipse day or on Sankranti except during Ashada masam. It is also done on special occasions and during times of achievements as an offering of gratitude to the Lord. These occasions include marriage, graduation, new job, and the purchase of a new home to name a few. In addition, it is said that a devotional performance of this puja will bear children to couples trying to start a family. Summary of the puja process:
The puja starts by a prayer to Lord Ganesha, to remove all obstacles that may occur as a result of incorrectly performing the puja. This is done by chanting all the names of Lord Ganesha and offering prasad (a food offering, usually consisting of one of Lord Ganesha’s favorite foods – modak, a sugar and coconut mixture, or lhadu) and the showering of flower petals.
Another part of the prayer involves a prayer to the Navagraha’s – the nine important celestial beings in the universe. They consist of Surya (the Sun), Chandra (the moon), Angaaraka/Chevaai (Mars), Budha (Mercury), Guru aka Bruhaspati (Jupiter), Shukra (Venus), Sani (Saturn), Rahu (the head of the Demon snake), and Ketu (the tail of the Demon snake).
The rest of the puja consists of worship to Satyanarayana, an extremely benevolent form of Lord Vishnu. First “panchamritam” is used to clean the place where the deity is placed. After placing the deity in the correct position, Satyanaraya swami is worshipped. Names of Satyanarayana are chanted along with offering of a variety of prasad (including a mixture of milk, honey, ghee/butter, yogurt, sugar) and flower petals.
Another requirement of the puja is that the story of the puja be heard among all those observing and partaking in the pooja. The story involves the origin of the puja, the benefits of it, and the potential mishaps that may occur with the careless performance of the puja.
The prayer concludes with an Aarti, which consists of revolving a small fire-lit-lamp in the vicinity of an image of the Lord. After the puja is over, participants and observers of the pooja are required to ingest in the prasad that was offered and blessed by the Lord.
It is told that Satyanarayan Katha is in REVA volume of Skanda Purana. But this volume is devoted to pilgrimages on the valley of river REVA. In Satyanarayana there is no Reva river. In original Skanda Purana there is nothing like Satyanarayana. Recent Skanda Puranas added it with clear note of its new addition in Skanda. Puja vidhanam:
The Satyanarayan Puja is performed in reverence to the Narayan form of Lord Vishnu. The Lord in this form is considered an embodiment of truth. This puja is conducted to ensure abundance in ones life. Many people carry out this puja immediately after or along with an auspicious occasion like a marriage or moving into a new house or any other success in life. It is believed the ceremony originated in Bengal as Satya Pir and was later adapted into Satyanarayan puja.